• Twitter Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon

© 2019 by Extrapedestrian. Proudly created with Wix.com

ex·tra·pe·des·tri·an
/ˈekstrə pəˈdestrēən/


noun

        1. a person moving along a road or in a developed area on foot or by vehicle that is primarily human-powered.
                       "Extrapedestrians traveling to and from work, school, businesses, and home produce a low                             carbon footprint, create more space on our roads and parking infrastructures, and live                                   generally healthier lives compared to those who commute by car."

     synonyms: bicyclist, skateboarder, runner, commuter
     
antonyms: motorist, driver

 

adjective

        1. a form of traveling or commuting that is primarily human-powered.

                       "Extrapedestrian travel is the cleanest, most efficient method of transportation, and a vital                              part of the solution to transportation equity, traffic congestion, and parking shortages within                         urban environments."

The Extrapedestrian Street Project is a social impact organization that seeks to disrupt urban mobility and the laws that govern it, making our existing infrastructure safer, more equitable, more efficient, and more sustainable.

 

OUR STRATEGY

DISRUPTING THE INFRASTRUCTURE OF URBAN MOBILITY

 

Identify a series of streets to be taken off the traffic grid and converted into mobility-centered green space that is exclusively available to extrapedestrian traffic - providing safe, convenient, and environmentally friendly access to the city's neighborhoods, resources, and multi-modal transportation options - separated and protected from motorized vehicle traffic by the existing city blocks that form a natural barrier to high traffic streets.  

 

REVISING POLICIES & LAWS

There are many opportunities to make extrapedestrian transportation safer and more attractive, which will be key to reducing traffic congestion and solving for limited street-side car storage options in the city.  Isolating extrapedestrian traffic to specific streets gives us an opportunity to rethink how we regulate and enforce traffic, how we utilize space that is considered a "right of way", as well as how we pay for necessary maintenance and improvements to our roads.  This is truly an opportunity to reimagine our streets.